Monday, November 29, 2004

Understanding MMO - Part 2

This week (wk13) , Wiley's reading requirements asks us to examine the following questions:



  • Are teaching and learning really done differently here than in classrooms? If so, how? If not, why?

  • Use general constructs in your discussion, like guidance, feedback, practice, presentation of information, timing of presentation, etc. Illustrate your points with examples from your own gaming experience.


Q: ‘When does MMO start to get boring?'

A week ago, I asked on Wiley's blog ‘When does MMO start to get boring?' And Marion posted the same question this week. Just like Marion , I was a Counter Strike (CS) buff too. But CS as a game never got too boring… because as a first shooter game, you never know when an enemy is going to cut your throat from behind… or a crazy teammate shoot you by mistake.


But I did find co-operating with other players in CS difficult. Mostly because I did not stick to a 'clan' or group. And did not foster enough trust or feel part of that group. However, I did fight teams that worked very well, and epitomizes cooperation and teamwork. With snipers (a.k.a. camper!) stationed at strategic spots , that made breaking through defenses a pain. 'fire in the hole!' via bombs or smoke grenades was the only way to get through... ah, memories! :)


I enjoyed my initial experience with lineage, but got bored soon when much boring leveling-up activity was needed before my character could progress. It did not have a clear achievable aim compared to games like AOE, Starcraft. Even CS had a simple 'save the hostages' aim for the player to achieve. In terms of hoarding property... or whatever currency that fuels the economies of MMO game, it bored me.


Unlike Mark , I did not meet mean people, but had people thinking I was 'faking' it. they felt that I knew more than I was 'acting'. I have suspected some 'weak' players in other games before, you know... those who create accounts to react havoc on the scores of other players... (*blush* I was one of them) so that your own personal score gets better. But in lineage environment, I am not sure how this can occur. Maybe someone who reads this post can respond and explain to me why?


Although I felt that the online avatars were very helpful, but unlike Kami , I got frustrated with trying to keep up with my 'peers'. Peers meaning the other thousand of players online who have managed to join a blood pledge... The NPC could only guide one so far. Unlike AOE, where I could learn to examine strategies in battle play, I found lineage more of a treasure hunt... gathering commodities and trading inventories just to get to the level where you can participate in a real joint battle. But with so much emphasis placed on gathering those odds and ends... what happens should someone release a patch that made the demon amour (that took 100 hours to assemble) suddenly become obsolete? That thought alone was a real incentive killer. In my experience with other online multi-player strategy games like AOE or starcraft, when a strategy/tactic gets too strong, it is also 'patched up'. like the infamous 'marine rush', or 'reaver drop'... so, in essence nothing escapes the threat of 'Nerfs' ( Burke, June 2002 )


Shelly had an interesting way of summing her lineage experience. Compared to her, my Schema Theory changed when I found out that death resulted in no penalties until you reach level 10. Before that, I avoided and ran away from enemies I cannot beat. Now I commit ‘suicide' just to be able to restart at starting point (ok, I still don't know how to buy a damn transportation scroll!). She says Lineage supports constructivist theories of learning. Now for Constructivism to work, does it not require some form of prior knowledge before you can make sense of the newly acquired knowledge? Before lineage, did all of us even know what orc s were? or what a scimitar is? I have my doubts… But I do agree that lineage does provide an environment where 'I am allowed to construct and negotiate meaning with other players.


This post cannot be complete without an honorable mention of ‘ John Roe '. Like Dave Wiley commented in John's blog, I concur that we find wonders in dealing with people outside of class (relatively newbies). Some sage (probably a 13 yr old) will open your horizons to 'how deep the rabbit hole goes...' in lineage. :)


Truthfully, how many of us are going to continue playing this game? If it was not for class, and grades? I am really curious… :)


Cheers,

BH

5 Comments:

At November 29, 2004 at 11:20 AM, Blogger JoseGomez said...

Great post as always,

"I enjoyed my initial experience with lineage, but got bored soon when much boring leveling-up activity was needed before my character could progress. It did not have a clear achievable aim compared to games like AOE, Starcraft. Even CS had a simple 'save the hostages' aim for the player to achieve. In terms of hoarding property... or whatever currency that fuels the economies of MMO game, it bored me."

I guess it all depends. I felt there was a goal, better armor, higher levels. When I found someone to "school" me it was even more exciting when the levels you could reach were over 50...I'm determined to get that high, so I keep playing.

 
At December 2, 2004 at 8:26 AM, Blogger David said...

Well thought out and, again, thought-provoking. I don't get a sense for how *you* would use games to support learning. What blend of class and game would you employ? What types of content are amenable to learning by game play?

 
At February 21, 2005 at 4:50 PM, Blogger Nathan Lowell said...

Has this blog died with the end of the course?

 
At March 9, 2005 at 5:29 PM, Anonymous BH said...

Myself leaving a comment to myself... :)

Nathan by the way, for those of you who don't know... is a distance learning guru with AECT.. *smile*

Its been a while... and I stopped blogging to do other stuff... but am in a position now to get back to blogging.

I never did check what happened with the class... left rather abrubtly... don't even know what grade dr. wiley gave me... no joke!

Well, I will respond in greater detail on the main post soon...

cheers,
Bing

 
At February 26, 2007 at 7:01 AM, Blogger bhchia said...

Its been a few years since I last visited this blog. Quite a long time to leave one's blog unattended :)

Not blogging like I used to during my postgrad days in Utah State (good times!), but still trying my best to maintain one 'proper' blog these days. For those interested, the new permanent blog is at: http://www.shummerville.com/elearning/

 

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